Let’s eat! Enbridge’s Homegrown Recipes cookbook profiles (Part 2)

Southern Ontario’s Turner family helping to cultivate the local food movement

The local food movement has been gathering momentum in recent years, spawning a veritable army of “localvores.”

But it’s always been a way of life for Diann and Ross Turner.

The Turners grow corn, soybeans and small grains on their farm near Mallorytown, Ontario, east of Kingston. And the Mallorytown region has a perennial bumper crop of produce, including tomatoes, strawberries, blueberries and sweet corn.

“Eating locally supports our local farmers and our local businesses,” says Diann, who tends a large garden on the Turner property. “All these people are trying to make a living . . . and it’s much healthier.

“Nothing,” she adds, “beats homemade taste.”

Ross, in Diann’s words, is a “true blood farmer,” born and raised in the country and having owned his own dairy herd as a young man. Ross’s strong connection to the land has driven his passion for conservation and stewardship.



“From the time he was very small, he wanted to work the land,” says Diann. “He feels like he’s giving back to humanity by producing food.”

The Turners are one of several families across Canada being profiled in Enbridge’s newly produced Homegrown Recipes cookbook, which is being distributed to neighbors along our rights-of-way starting this summer.

The Homegrown Recipes collection includes more than 110 tantalizing kitchen creations—breakfasts, breads, soups, salads, sides, entrees and desserts—submitted by our neighbors near Enbridge’s network of pipelines and facilities.

Because just as land is passed down through the generations, so too are some of the most treasured recipes that connect us to family, friends and communities—including Diann’s rhubarb streusel muffins, included in our Homegrown Recipes collection.

As with many rurally connected communities across Canada, neighbours help out neighbours in a pinch with harvest, planting duties, and other priorities.

“It’s a small community. Everyone knows each other,” says Diann. “And we’re extremely supportive of one another.”

Check out previous instalments of the Homegrown Recipes cookbook profiles:

Part 1: Pint-sized entrepreneurs tend to their pumpkin patch in southwestern Manitoba

(Are your taste buds sufficiently stimulated? Click on this link to download portions of Enbridge’s Homegrown Recipes cookbook . . . and this link for Diann’s rhubarb streusel muffins.)