Indigenous Engagement

Overview

We are committed to respecting the distinct rights of Indigenous Peoples

We recognize the history, uniqueness and diversity of Indigenous Peoples and strive to build trust and lasting relationships with them. In the course of our projects and operations, we are regularly in contact with many Indigenous communities and groups in Canada and Native American tribes in the U.S. In both countries, legal requirements and good business practice mandate consultation and engagement with Indigenous communities on energy infrastructure projects and operations.

In May 2018 Enbridge released a special discussion paper on Indigenous Rights and Relationships in North American Infrastructure. At the end of 2018, we will provide a summary of the feedback we receive on this paper and how we are using that feedback to improve our performance in this important area.

This discussion paper represents Enbridge’s voluntary response to a shareholder resolution brought forward at our 2017 Annual General Meeting. At that meeting, Enbridge committed publicly to expand reporting on the steps we are taking to: (1) implement our Indigenous Peoples Policy, and (2) integrate Indigenous rights sensitivities into our investment review processes through early identification across our different types of investments.

2 performance objectives:

  • Ensuring we have robust policies and practices in place to support ongoing, comprehensive engagement with Indigenous communities
  • Creating economic participation opportunities for Indigenous communities

2017 Highlights

Indigenous Engagement Infographic

Management Approach

Indigenous Consultation

Our policies, programs and initiatives involving Indigenous peoples and communities are rooted in our respect for their formal and informal rights and interests. In all instances we seek to consult with Indigenous communities about our projects and operations, and to resolve any concerns or complaints through direct communication, engagement and, where appropriate, negotiation or mediation.

2017 Performance

Ensuring We Have Robust Policies and Practices in Place to Support Ongoing, Comprehensive Engagement with Indigenous Communities

Because Indigenous Peoples in Canada and the U.S. have distinct rights, Enbridge acknowledges that Indigenous Peoples are more than stakeholders and has adopted a separate corporate policy to ensure that our activities respect those rights. Our Indigenous Peoples Policy outlines the key principles that guide our engagement with Indigenous Nations and groups in areas in North America where our pipelines cross their lands.

We are implementing our Indigenous Peoples Policy through guidelines, practices and management systems that recognize the legal, regulatory and historic context on Indigenous rights and support best practices on Indigenous consultation and engagement across all of our projects and operations.

While we believe that building sustainable relationships with Indigenous Nations connects directly to each of our core values—Integrity, Safety and Respect—we also believe that it is integral to business success. Historically, Enbridge—like other companies with linear infrastructure projects—has pursued project-specific, limited-term capacity agreements or relationships with local Indigenous Nations. Today, we have come to more fully appreciate the value that building longer-term relationships can create for both the communities involved and our business. Depending on the nature of a project, elements of our Indigenous consultation and community engagement process can include:


Respond

Responding to community issues, grievances and concerns through direct communication with the communities that are involved.

Agree

Entering into formal and informal agreements and/or collaborations to provide extra assurances regarding community support, and Indigenous involvement in cultural and environmental protection, or and in project construction and operation through economic opportunities.

Inform

Providing information about the steps we have taken to minimize the cumulative effects of development, such as following an existing right-of-way.

Share

Sharing our plans, including business plans and strategies for environmental and cultural protection.

Meet

Meet with community members to discuss additional actions we could take to resolve any concerns.


Applying Our Indigenous Peoples Policy: A Focus on Enbridge’s Line 3 Replacement Program

Creating Economic Participation Opportunities for Indigenous Communities

Socio-economic Participation through Management Systems and Processes for Supply Chain Management:

Indigenous socio-economic participation is one of the key areas in our Indigenous Engagement Program. We have long recognized that hiring Indigenous businesses and contractors supports local employment, gives us the opportunity to understand available services and talent, and helps us build trust and relationships. We have also recognized the important contribution that Indigenous businesses make each year to the overall economy, and have a long history of working with them.

We have a specialized team within our broader Supply Chain Management (SCM) function to focus on expanding opportunities for socio-economic participation by Indigenous groups. This team includes Indigenous business development specialists with the skill sets required to support the achievement of our goals for Indigenous procurement.

In 2017, we spent more than $200 million in North America on procuring good and services from Indigenous suppliers and continue to add more Indigenous suppliers in the U.S. and Canada to our Indigenous Business database.

Dollars Spent on Materials and Services Sourced from Indigenous Businesses in Canada and the U.S.
2015 2016 2017
Major Projects and Liquids Pipelines (MP/LP) >$63 million $79 million $136.2 million
Union Gas $6 million $13 million $10.5 million
Gas Transportation & Midstream* - - $70.1 million
Number of Qualified Indigenous Businesses Identified and Documented in Our Databases / Business Listings
MP/LP Canada - 600 760
MP/LP U.S. - - 100
Union Gas - - 74

* In British Columbia Only

Community Investment: Building Meaningful Relationships with Indigenous Communities

Enbridge is proud to partner with and support Indigenous communities near our projects and operational rights-of-way. We strive to share our success with the communities where we operate. We use investment, partnerships, and human capital to support community organizations that share our commitment to fueling quality of life and making a positive, lasting impact in communities.

In 2017, Enbridge continued its long-standing support for educational, safety and cultural initiatives with Indigenous communities, investing more than $1.7 million.

Some examples of our Indigenous community investment include:

  • Through the Energy Futures Lab, we supported the Iron and Earth Solar Skills Program, providing solar installation skills training to energy workers and Indigenous community members. This pilot program supported the installation of a solar system at a community daycare at the Louis Bull Tribe in Alberta.
  • Enbridge Aboriginal Home Program in partnership with Habitat for Humanity supported building homes for Indigenous families as part of the Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter Work Project, as well as supporting the building of homes with the Tyendinaga Mohawk Community in Ontario.
  • We supported a transformational reading incentive program at Tsi Snaihne School, which is governed by the Ahkwesãhsne Mohawk Board of Education in Ontario.
Workers installing a solar panel on residence

Members of the Louis Bull Tribe, in central Alberta, and fellow graduates of the Iron & Earth solar skill program install solar panels on the roof of a community daycare facility in October 2017. Iron & Earth hopes to upskill 1,000 oil, gas and coal workers, as well as Indigenous community members, as solar specialists through hands-on installations.

Workers installing a solar panel on residence

Above: Members of the Louis Bull Tribe, in central Alberta, and fellow graduates of the Iron & Earth solar skill program install solar panels on the roof of a community daycare facility in October 2017. Iron & Earth hopes to upskill 1,000 oil, gas and coal workers, as well as Indigenous community members, as solar specialists through hands-on installations.

2015 2016 20171
Amount of community investment funding provided to Indigenous communities in Canada >$800,000 >$1 million >$1.7 million

12017 reflects Spectra Energy & Enbridge as a combined company..

Indigenous Employment

We are continuing our efforts to increase Indigenous employment by working in partnership with communities, schools and local governments. Some of these partnerships include:

Creating Hope Economic Prosperity Partnership (CHEPP):
Enbridge participated in an advisory committee that is planning three annual Indigenous Women's Talent Forums; bringing together Indigenous women interested in industry and trades, with employer representatives.

Engineering Futures:
A partnership with Edmonton Catholic Schools’ Braided Journeys Program, “Engineering Futures” matches Indigenous high school and junior high girls to female engineering mentors at Enbridge

Enbridge’s Line 3 Replacement Program has also created multiple opportunities for Indigenous participation. Over and above the standard positions that would be filled on any large pipeline construction project, we have committed to providing jobs for Indigenous construction monitors over the life of the Canadian portion of the project.

Spotlight: Enhancing Indigenous Economic Participation in Our Supply Chain
Spotlight: Helping to Preserve Heritage and History on the Line 10 Westover Segment Replacement Project

Cultural Awareness and Education

We provide Indigenous awareness training at Enbridge in support of our commitment to fostering an understanding of the history, traditions, rights and culture of Indigenous peoples among our employees and contractors. Through this training, we strive to build the capacity of our employees and contractors so that they can better communicate and engage with local Indigenous peoples, and can acquire the tools necessary to build trusted and respectful relationships. We initiated this training in 2016 and in 2017, more than 450 employees and contractors received Indigenous Awareness training in five of our operating regions in Canada and the U.S. We will begin to offer online awareness training that will be rolled out to the enterprise in 2018.

457 employees and contractors received training through 17 sessions in 2017

750 employees and contractors though 26 session received training since 2016

Indigenous Engagement Performance Data Summary

Dollars Spent on Materials and Services Sourced from Indigenous Businesses in Canada and the U.S.
2015 2016 2017
Major Projects and Liquids Pipelines (MP/LP) >$63 million $79 million $136.2 million
Union Gas $6 million $13 million $10.5 million
Gas Transportation & Midstream* - - $70.1 million
Number of Qualified Indigenous Businesses Identified and Documented in Our Databases / Business Listings
MP/LP Canada - 600 760
MP/LP U.S. - - 100
Union Gas - - 74
Amount of community investment funding provided to Indigenous communities in Canada
Enbridge More than $800,000 More than $1 million More than $1.7 million
Number of employees and contractors receiving Indigenous awareness training
Enbridge ** 750 457

* In British Columbia Only


Conversations

A Conversation with Wennell Swampy, Samson Cree Nation near Edmonton, Alberta

1) What compelled you to apply for Enbridge’s Aboriginal Construction Monitoring Program? What interested you?

I wanted to challenge myself and obtain more skills, experience and knowledge from a higher, managerial position in the oil industry in hopes to maintain that career level in the near future.

2) How was your experience being employed as an Indigenous Monitor for Enbridge’s Line 3 project?

With my previous position in the oil field, the majority of my time was spent in the office. Therefore, I was reading a lot of paperwork and having to imagine projects being built compared to actually having that visual perspective from start to finish. This was a totally different and amazing experience. That makes me proud to be a part of that!

3) How will this experience and the skills you developed help in future employment?

It's given me a broader view of the different trades that are out there in the pipeline industry—all the different activities, workers, heavy equipment, etc.; so much going on at once during construction. This has given me the opportunity and experience in what is expected or what to watch for and how to deal with different situations, whether it's in regards to safety or just doing your job in general.

4) Are you still working on the Line 3 Replacement Program or has the work wrapped up? What are your future plans?

We've come to an end due to spring breakup. However, I am looking forward to receiving a call back to finish up the reclamation part of the Line 3 Replacement Program once work commences again. I also hope that the experience and skills I’ve obtained through the monitoring program will benefit me for any other future opportunities!