Michigan Tech alumni keep Line 5 operating and safe



People launching a buoy from a boat Michigan Technical University and Enbridge have collaborated over the years on projects to enhance safety on Line 5 at the Straits of Mackinac, including (above) the 2015 launch of an environmental monitoring buoy providing water current data to large shipping traffic and (inset) an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) to scan the bottom of the Straits near the Line 5 crossing. Numerous MTU grads work for Enbridge in Michigan, helping to ensure the safety of our pipeline operations.

Technical jobs blend education, specialized skills

March 30, 2022

For Greg LeJeune and almost two dozen of his colleagues, the Upper Peninsula holds a special place in their hearts.

In addition to having lived in the Upper Peninsula for 26 years, LeJeune’s dad and stepmom live in the Upper Peninsula, as do his wife’s two brothers, three nieces and their families.

The Bay College alumnus and former Brampton Township volunteer firefighter is a senior regional engineer for Enbridge and among at least 22 Enbridge employees who are graduates of the Michigan Technical University (MTU)—with graduation dates spanning more than 30 years, from 1991 through 2014.

A 2007 MTU graduate, LeJeune obtained his bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from MTU. In 2014, he joined Enbridge.

“I first learned about Enbridge from attending the Upper Peninsula Safety Fair at Bay de Noc Community College in Escanaba while working for an area paper mill,” said LeJeune. “I also remember participating in the training Enbridge hosted for local first responders when I was a volunteer firefighter.”

Homegrown talent, expertise pay off

Managing the reliable and safe operation of Enbridge Line 5 takes a coordinated team, which includes fellow MTU graduate Jason Seidenstucker, a certified project management professional (PMP).

Based in Enbridge’s Escanaba office, Seidenstucker holds a degree in mechanical engineering from MTU. The senior regional engineer is a dedicated resource to Line 5. 

James Snider 

“I have not heard a viable alternative for the Midwest to replace the energy that we move through Line 5, and I can see the effort Enbridge makes to maintain and upgrade Line 5.”

—James Snider, Michigan-based Enbridge employee and 1991 MTU graduate who holds a degree in environmental engineering


“My focus supports the day-to-day operation, planned maintenance activities/outages and the proactive development and implementation of long-range forecasts to help ensure safe and reliable operation of Line 5,” Seidenstucker explains.

In addition to collaborating with various Enbridge teams, Seidenstucker works with the crews in the field to help ensure the successful installation of new assets, such as the Great Lakes Tunnel, and helps assure Enbridge meets regulatory and compliance standards.

Greg LeJeune and son 

“I remember participating in the training Enbridge hosted for local first responders when I was a volunteer firefighter.”

—Greg LeJeune (at right with son Austin), a 2007 MTU grad and a senior regional engineer for Enbridge in Michigan


Their colleague and 2014 MTU alumna, Madeline (Haben) Teitelbaum, PMP, is an Enbridge senior advisor, operations programs. Holding a double major in engineering management and sports & fitness management, she joined Enbridge eight years ago and has worked in a variety of capacities on Line 5.

“I have supported Line 5 in a number of different ways,” said Teitelbaum. “I have been involved in our pipeline integrity dig program as well as some smaller maintenance projects in our facilities across Michigan and Wisconsin.”

Teamwork, effort ensure energy keeps flowing to Michiganders

Teitelbaum also works with various stakeholder management programs that support Line 5, as does Paul Meneghini, Enbridge manager of community engagement for the Great Lakes Region (which includes Michigan, Illinois, Indiana and Ohio).

Paul Meneghini 

“We have a dedicated team that focuses on Line 5, day in, day out. . . . Keeping Line 5 operating is vital for Michigan and the region—no doubt about it.”

—Paul Meneghini, a 1993 MTU grad in civil engineering and a manager of Michigan-focused community engagement with Enbridge


An Upper Peninsula native, Meneghini is a 1993 MTU graduate with a degree in civil engineering.  He leads the team of professionals who facilitate stakeholder engagement and local community engagement activities along Enbridge’s pipeline systems.

“We have a dedicated team that focuses on Line 5, day in, day out,” said Meneghini. The pipeline is important because it carries energy that Michiganders count on every day. It helps create propane that heats homes and businesses in Michigan. The light crude oil in Line 5 is important for the broader region because it’s turned into thousands of products, including medicines, eyeglasses, computers, and jet fuel, to mention just a few. Keeping Line 5 operating is vital for Michigan and the region—no doubt about it.”

A 1991 MTU graduate, James Snider, PE (MI), CHMM, has a degree in environmental engineering and is steadfast in his support of Line 5.

“It’s a significant source of energy for the Midwest, let alone Michigan,” he said. “I have not heard a viable alternative for the Midwest to replace the energy that we move through Line 5, and I can see the effort Enbridge makes to maintain and upgrade Line 5.”

Michiganders will help build the Tunnel too

To continue to provide area residents and businesses a safe, reliable and significant source of energy, Enbridge is planning to construct the Great Lakes Tunnel. The critical utility infrastructure modernization project will encase in concrete a replacement section of Enbridge’s Line 5 deep below the lakebed in the Straits. The Tunnel will eliminate the chance of an anchor strike and virtually eliminate the chance of a release. The Tunnel could also accommodate other utilities, such as fiber optic cables for internet connectivity, while allowing enough space for Enbridge to maintain the Tunnel and Line 5.

“I am proud to be working on the Tunnel project,” said Meneghini. “It’s a true win-win for my home state. The Tunnel will protect the waters of the Great Lakes and the environment, while keeping energy flowing to those who need it. It doesn’t get much better than that.”

To date, Enbridge has invested more than $100 million in preparing to construct the Great Lakes Tunnel Project, which will involve a highly qualified team, including Enbridge’s many MTU graduates and other employees proud to call Michigan “home.”